Osteopathic Medicine 101

In the late 19th century, Andrew Taylor Still, an MD, introduced osteopathic medicine. His philosophy focused on the unity of all body parts and the relationship the musculoskeletal system has as an element of good health. He developed a better understanding of how the mind, body and spirit are interconnected based upon anatomic relationships and how obstructions of these key relationships might influence health.  He also went on to state that the interrelation of organ systems and a mind that is separate from the cognitive mind helps facilitate the body’s ability to return to health.

We treat the whole person: mind, body and spirit.

Osteopathic medicine combines the needs of the patient, current practice of medicine, and interconnectivity of the body’s ability to heal itself. For more than a century, osteopathic physicians have built a tradition of bringing health care to where it is needed – primary care specialties of family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics and obstetrics and gynecology.

Campbell physicians become DOs that fill a critical need by practicing in rural and medically underserved communities.

DOs and MDs are difficult to distinguish; both fully licensed to practice medicine and perform surgery. However, the foundation of osteopathic physicians is built upon that people are more than the sum of their parts. Osteopathic physicians practice medicine with a focus on treating the entire person rather than just the symptoms.

Learn more about osteopathic medicine and the American Osteopathic Association.

Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (OMM)

DOs provide Osteopathic Manipulation Medicine, or OMM, in the realm of healthcare. OMM is a popular manual treatment that heals the body and correct faulty function of the musculoskeletal system. As a student at Campbell Medicine, expect to learn how to use hands to diagnose, treat and prevent illness and injury.

Learn more about OMM

 

Rooted in osteopathic history

In 1892, Dr. Still established the first school of osteopathic medicine, the American School of Osteopathy, in Kirksville, Missouri. Vermont was the first state to recognize osteopathic medicine in 1896. In 1897, the American Association for Advancement of Osteopathy, presently known as the American Osteopathic Association, was founded in Kirksville, Missouri.


“To find health should be the object of the physician. Anyone can find disease.”

Andrew T. Still, Founder of Osteopathy